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Scotland, ghost to ghost

An essential route for the best legends of a country of legend

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Scotland, ghost to ghost
neist point lighthouse

Scotland: you will recognize her by her ghosts

Who has never dreamed of Scotland? It’s hearing a bagpipe and visualizing yourself among castles of legend by squinting at a sunset of impossible beauty. Scotland is castles, infinite moors, lakes of unknown depth, back roads for intrepid explorers and… many ghosts. Ask anybody, if you dare to doubt him a minute he will look at you with that special disdain they keep for the most ignorant. At this point it is best to surrender to the evidence and select . Because not all ghosts are the same and of course not all the places they choose to entertain themselves in what reaches the end of the world have the same charm. Because of that, because there are so many, we have chosen the ones that have the best taste,so that in addition to being scared you have a great time enjoying all the charms of a land where above all stands out the spirit unbeatable to the discouragement of its inhabitants. Those who are dressed in plaid skirt in the middle of winter, those with long, red hair that can whistle like a sailor. Those who, for something will be, both resist reaching the beyond. We present you an essential route through Scotland at the hands of its best ghosts.

St. Andrews: ruins with overpopulation of ghosts

St. Andrews: ruins with overpopulation of ghosts

This beautiful fishing village, famous for its spectacular golf courses, also has  one of the most ghostly sets of ruins in Europe. What remains of the ancient Abbey of St. Andrews splashes white stone the edge of a magnificent cliff. The ghosts of the Abbey are famous for the bizarreness of their stories, although perhaps we can make an exception with the known as The Screaming Skull of Greyfriars (the shrill head of Greyfriars). Apparently, it is a simple monk unhappy with death that is dedicated to scare visitors by showing only his big screaming head. In addition, there are two female ghosts, one known as the White Lady and another as the Lady of the Veil. Both were nuns belonging to the old congregation of Saint Mary Stuarts. The first decided to take the habits when beheaded his fiancé, but once put into flour life was so difficult that  ended up dying of grief and boredom. Today you can see her roam the so-called Torre Encantada with the face of few friends. The second has a slightly more twisted story. Apparently she was one of the most beautiful girls in the place, but she did have a religious vocation, so when a handsome gentleman asked for her hand, the audacious novice decided to disfigure her face to cut it off with her intentions and he did it so well that when the gentleman saw the result, he opted to commit suicide. The Lady of the Veil also did not last long as a nun, because in a short time she ended up dying of grief, remorse and it is possible that some shame, that is why since then she only lets herself be seen with a veil covering her disfigured face.

Edinburgh or how to make the mystery profitable

Edinburgh or how to make the mystery profitable

The capital of Scotland is one of the most beautiful cities in Europe and one of the best known to make the mystery profitable. The ghosts are everywhere but without a doubt it is the Old Town – the old town – that has more specters per square meter. To begin with, because underneath its perfect cobblestone that seems to have just emerged from a medieval tale there is a whole underground labyrinth of tunnels, passages, streets and even houses with rooms. Four floors excavated in the enormous and picturesque rock that delimits the center of the city. When the industrial revolution arrived in 1753, the authorities chose to demonstrate their power by erecting large buildings and preventing the center from being filled with workers’ houses. How did they manage to manage their particularbrick boom? Building, but down. While the workers were crammed into the subsoil, the city grew in beauty. The most significant building of the time – and therefore the most spooky – is the Royal Exchange, located on the foundations of five alleys: Stewart Close, Pearsons Close, Allan Close, Craig Close and, last but not least, Mary King’s Close . Everything seemed fine, but the plague forced a new improvisation from the authorities. To avoid contagion they decided to block the entrance to the underground city, of course with people inside. Those same people are the ones who today populate with ghosts the old town of one of the most beautiful cities in the world.

The Ghost of Grassmarket

The Ghost of Grassmarket

To spend the drink and continue enjoying the company of ghosts nothing better than to take a good look at The Grassmarket, the place where formerly criminals were executed. The names of the pubs inspire a lot: The Last Drop – the last drop – for example is a classic. Here the main ghost belongs to Lord Weir, an old and respectable mayor, until it was discovered that he committed incest with his sister and that he was an animal lover in the most literal sense of expression. How could it be otherwise ended up hanging in The Grassmarket on May 11, 1670. Since then, every May 11, they tell that a black coach with headless horses transports through the streets of Edinburgh to the ill-fated ruler.

Eilean Donan Castle and her Spanish ghost

Eilean Donan Castle and her Spanish ghost

We are facing the emblematic photo of the typical Scottish Castle. Surrounded by water and mist, embraced by the deserts, almost inaccessible but for a centennial stone bridge, blatantly mysterious. It’s impossible not to hear the half-crumbling silhouette of Eilean Castle. What you probably do not know is that his ghost is Spanish. It actually represents the 50 Spanish soldiers who lost their lives here in 1719, during the Jacobite Revolt. For some reason, he decided to stay and since then he appears with his head under his arm, especially in the room that served as a shop and that today is the room dedicated to explaining the history of the Castle.

Lake Lomond and its wide catalog of ghosts

Lake Lomond: a wide catalog of ghosts

The largest lake in the United Kingdom also holds the label of being the most beautiful, romantic and one of the most popular songs inspired. There is more to look for a CD of Scottish music in any store of memories to find us with what is almost, almost a hymn to the earth, the song that takes by title Loch Lomond. Crossing it by ferry is a delight, as well as enjoying the sunset views of one of its 38 islands. However, and judging from their ghosts, not all have been happy in such a bucolic setting. In West Dunbartonshire, a small village on the shore, is the pub The Drover’s Inn, famous for the ghost of George, a regular whose ashes were kept with devotion by the fireplace for years. There is also Angus, a guy who was killed in the vicinity in 1750 and who since then has taken the habit of agonizing with his screams of pain to customers. The worst is undoubtedly the ghost of a young girl who drowned in the lake in the nineteenth century. The owners of the hotel improvised their burning chapel in room number 6 and there are those who say that at night there is a humid and disconsolate presence in the room. As if this were not enough there are guests who claim to have seen in his room a whole family praying at the foot of his bed. Of course, The Drover’s ghost catalog is extensive, and since the Fonda is still open, it is very possible that given the influx, if you try, you will find one for yourself.

Cruden Bay, the inspiration of Bram Stoker

Cruden Bay, the inspiration of Bram Stoker

Aberdeen, the city of the huge oil platforms of the North Sea and the protagonist of luxury that materializes black gold, is one of the most unknown cities in Scotland. Agreste and romantically rich, it has a wild coast of picturesque and undisturbed beauty. Cruden Bay stands out very close to the city, one of the most representative sailor villages of the charm of the authentic. So much that Bram Stoker himself decided to spend his summers here. It was the nineteenth century and the writer was inspired by the ruins of Castle Slains to describe the dwelling of Count Dracula . A tribute to the mystery of the place! Stayed at The Kilmarnock Arms Inn and the grace is in that, if you want, you can do it too. This delicious little hotel is the perfect place to wait for the ghosts-according to your guest book there is more than one-or to write a best seller. That goes in tastes and talent.

Stirling Castle, a green ghost and a pink one

Stirling Castle, a green ghost and a pink one

The majestic Castle of Stirling -impressed in every Scottish route that boasts- has two colorful ghosts. No joke, one is green and another is pink, although they are not some, they are some, both women. The Green Ladyhas a sad history: valet of the famous and fearsome Queen Mary of Scotland – crowned precisely in this Castle – burned to death one night while saving the life of her queen. Apparently the whole castle slept less herself and that was why she was the first to realize that the curtains in the royal room had been lit with a candle. He managed to wake Mary up and stop the fire, but he died trying. Today she is seen touring the rooms, making sure, the legend says, that the Castle does not suffer a fire again. The case of the Lady Rosa is less clear: some say it is Queen Mary herself; others, that it is a young widow looking for her husband, killed in a battle. Perhaps more than looking for him, he wants to pray for him, because according to the chronicles of the place, usually appears walking between the Castle and the Chapel.

Glamis Castle

Glamis Castle, the most enchanted castle in Europe

They say that it is the most enchanted Castle in Scotland and, judging from the legends that surround it, it is very probable that mystery literature, very abundant in this land, is right. At sight it is at least one of the most spectacular. So let’s go with the list: The most popular is the ghost of the woman without a tongue. It is a pity that the legend does not tell how he lost such a useful body appendage, but what he does say is that his figure is seen in a window, pointing sadly to the hollow of his mouth. The Gray Lady also has her audience. In this case we know its history: it is the ghost of Lady Glamis, accused of witchcraft in 1537 and conveniently burned alive. Although she died at Edinburgh Castle, Lady Gladis has decided to spend eternity in her former home. The servant is another beloved ghost, although not much is known about him either, only that he appears in the Queen’s room and that he has never said this mouth is mine. The ghost of Count Beardie is undoubtedly the one that gives the most war, especially to children. The late aristocrat was an alcoholic and unpleasant human always prone to annoy the weakest. As a main feature, it must be said that his appearances are not limited to the Castle, but also swarms through the children’s bedrooms in the area with the face of few friends. Some say that during the day he hides in a secret room of the Castle, where he makes pacts with the Devil to fix his own from eternity.

Roslin Abbey, two ghosts in a single chapel

Roslin Abbey, two ghosts in a single chapel

Much has been written about this surprising and variegated to the delirium chapel of the fifteenth century. A lot and varied, because among others Dan Brown chose it as the place destined to hide the Holy Grail in his book The Da Vinci Code. “What else would we like,” the inhabitants of Roslin say without hesitation, but for the moment nothing has appeared here. Nothing physical they will say, because the apparitions that surround the chapel are numerous. The most famous ghost is known as the Apprentice and has a curious history. Legend has it that Master Mason in charge of carving the beautiful pillars of the temple made a trip to Rome in search of inspiration. What would not be his surprise when he returned and found the work magnificently finished by his apprentice.So much was his anger that in a fit of jealousy killed the artist with his work. But not to his ghost, who since then walks melancholy and aching the dark corridors of the temple. And he is not alone: ​​Sir Walter Scott already explained at the time that every time a descendant of the Prince of Orkney dies the chapel appears in the night as if illuminated by fire. In addition to strange lights and even stranger sounds, the parish priests claim to have seen a dark medieval monk surrounded by four knights pray on the high altar.

Inverness

Inverness, the headquarters of Nessie

Known for the never seen monster of the picturesque Loch Ness, the adorable ‘Nessie’, the truth is that the very northern city of Inverness -great and colorful- is well worth a visit. From here you can choose. If you like theme parks, go to the tourist center dedicated to the monster: you will receive an extra large size cardboard sculpture and you will suddenly lose the desire to see more ghosts. If you put more popular folklore and adventure, there are two excursions that you can not miss. One is Culloden Moor – the moor of Culloden – scene of the bloodiest battles of the already very busy history of Scotland. One of the worst defeats suffered in 1746 the army of the famous Bonnie Prince Charlie and, since then, it is said that the birds do not sing and that the souls in pain of their unfortunate warriors wander in confusion and discouragement in these desert lands brandishing their sabers before an invisible enemy. Another terrifying point is the Forest of Rothiemurchus, a tight and gloomy natural group inhabited by a four-legged ghost that challenges anyone who approaches their domain. Apparently, if you accept the challenge with gallantry everything will be fine, but if you turn out to be a coward, things get ugly. You dare?

Isle of Skye

Isle of Skye

The wonderful island of Skye, famous for its earthy whiskey, for its dramatic cliffs, for its delicious walks for walkers and the beauty of its corners facing the sea also has a few ghosts to contribute to the story. These are concentrated in the ruins of the Castle of Duntulm, abandoned in 1730. They say that among its spectral inhabitants there is a sandwich prisoner – very dissatisfied with its end – a nun with an easy tear and a nanny who accidentally dropped her son’s son out of the window and was punished to die alone in a boat in the middle of the brave sea. Their laments can still be heard on moonlit nights…

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